Igalia and the Chromium project

A couple of months ago I had the pleasure of speaking at the 43rd International Conference on Software Engineering (aka ICSE 2021), in the context of its “Spanish Industry Case Studies” track. We were invited to give a high level overview of the Chromium project and how Igalia contributes to it upstream.

This was an unusual chance to speak at a forum other than the usual conferences I attend to, so I welcomed this as a double opportunity to explain the project to people less familiar with Chromium than those attending events such as BlinkOn or the Web Engines Hackfest, as well as to spread some awareness on our work in there.

Contributing to Chromium is something we’ve been doing for quite a few years already, but I think it’s fair to say that in the past 2-3 years we have intensified our contributions to the project even more and diversified the areas that we contribute to, something I’ve tried to reflect in this talk in no more than 25 minutes (quite a challenge!). Actually, it’s precisely because of this amount of contributions that we’re currently the 2nd biggest non-Google contributor to the project in number of commits, and among the Top 5 contributors by team size (see a highlight on this from BlinkOn 14’s keynote). For a small consultancy company such as ours, it’s certainly something to feel proud of.

With all this in mind, I organized the talk into 2 main parts: First a general introduction to the Chromium project and then a summary of the main upstream work that we at Igalia have contributed recently to it. I focused on the past year and a half, since that seemed like a good balance that allowed me to highlight the most important bits without adding too much  information. And from what I can tell based on the feedback received so far, it seems the end result has been helpful and useful for some people without prior knowledge to understand things such as the differences between Chromium and Chrome, what ChromiumOS is and how our work on several different fronts (e.g. CSS, Accessibility, Ozone/X11/Wayland, MathML, Interoperability…) fits into the picture.

Obviously, the more technically inclined you are, and the more you know about the project, the more you’ll understand the different bits of information condensed into this talk, but my main point here is that you shouldn’t need any of that to be able to follow it, or at least that was my intention (but please let me know in the comments if you have any feedback). Here you have it:

You can watch the talk online (24:05 min) on our YouTube channel, as well as grab the original slide deck as a PDF in case you also want it for references, or to check the many links I included with pointers for further information and also for reference to the different sources used.

Last, I don’t want to finish this post without thanking once again to the organizers for the invitation and for runing the event, and in particular to Andrés-Leonardo Martínez-Ortiz and Javier Provecho for taking care of the specific details involved with the “Spanish Industry Case Studies” track.

Thank you all

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