Category Archives: Fosdem

Working on the Chromium Servicification Project

Published / by mario / Leave a Comment

Igalia & ChromiumIt’s been a few months already since I (re)joined Igalia as part of its Chromium team and I couldn’t be happier about it: right since the very first day, I felt perfectly integrated as part of the team that I’d be part of and quickly started making my way through the -fully upstream- project that would keep me busy during the following months: the Chromium Servicification Project.

But what is this “Chromium servicification project“? Well, according to the Wiktionary the word “servicification” means, applied to computing, “the migration from monolithic legacy applications to service-based components and solutions”, which is exactly what this project is about: as described in the Chromium servicification project’s website, the whole purpose behind this idea is “to migrate the code base to a more modular, service-oriented architecture”, in order to “produce reusable and decoupled components while also reducing duplication”.

Doing so would not only make Chromium a more manageable project from a source code-related point of view and create better and more stable interfaces to embed chromium from different projects, but should also enable teams to experiment with new features by combining these services in different ways, as well as to ship different products based in Chromium without having to bundle the whole world just to provide a particular set of features. 

For instance, as Camille Lamy put it in the talk delivered (slides here) during the latest Web Engines Hackfest,  “it might be interesting long term that the user only downloads the bits of the app they need so, for instance, if you have a very low-end phone, support for VR is probably not very useful for you”. This is of course not the current status of things yet (right now everything is bundled into a big executable), but it’s still a good way to visualise where this idea of moving to a services-oriented architecture should take us in the long run.

Chromium Servicification Layers

With this in mind, the idea behind this project would be to work on the migration of the different parts of Chromium depending on those components that are being converted into services, which would be part of a “foundation” base layer providing the core services that any application, framework or runtime build on top of chromium would need.

As you can imagine, the whole idea of refactoring such an enormous code base like Chromium’s is daunting and a lot of work, especially considering that currently ongoing efforts can’t simply be stopped just to perform this migration, and that is where our focus is currently aimed at: we integrate with different teams from the Chromium project working on the migration of those components into services, and we make sure that the clients of their old APIs move away from them and use the new services’ APIs instead, while keeping everything running normally in the meantime.

At the beginning, we started working on the migration to the Network Service (which allows to run Chromium’s network stack even without a browser) and managed to get it shipped in Chromium Beta by early October already, which was a pretty big deal as far as I understand. In my particular case, that stage was a very short ride since such migration was nearly done by the time I joined Igalia, but still something worth mentioning due to the impact it had in the project, for extra context.

After that, our team started working on the migration of the Identity service, where the main idea is to encapsulate the functionality of accessing the user’s identities right through this service, so that one day this logic can be run outside of the browser process. One interesting bit about this migration is that this particular functionality (largely implemented inside the sign-in component) has historically been located quite high up in the stack, and yet it’s now being pushed all the way down into that “foundation” base layer, as a core service. That’s probably one of the factors contributing to making this migration quite complicated, but everyone involved is being very dedicated and has been very helpful so far, so I’m confident we’ll get there in a reasonable time frame.

If you’re curious enough, though, you can check this status report for the Identity service, where you can see the evolution of this particular migration, along with the impact our team had since we started working on this part, back on early October. There are more reports and more information in the mailing list for the Identity service, so feel free to check it out and/or subscribe there if you like.

One clarification is needed, tough: for now, the scope of this migrations is focused on using the public C++ APIs that such services expose (see //services/<service_name>/public/cpp), but in the long run the idea is that those services will also provide Mojo interfaces. That will enable using their functionality regardless of whether you’re running those services as part of the browser’s process, or inside their own & separate processes, which will then allow the flexibility that chromium will need to run smoothly and safely in different kind of environments, from the least constrained ones to others with a less favourable set of resources at their disposal.

And this is it for now, I think. I was really looking forward to writing a status update about what I’ve been up to in the past months and here it is, even though it’s not the shortest of all reports.

FOSDEM 2019

One last thing, though: as usual, I’m going to FOSDEM this year as well, along with a bunch of colleagues & friends from Igalia, so please feel free to drop me/us a line if you want to chat and/or hangout, either to talk about work-related matters or anything else really.

And, of course, I’d be also more than happy to talk about any of the open job positions at Igalia, should you consider applying. There are quite a few of them available at the moment for all kind of things (most of them available for remote work): from more technical roles such as graphicscompilersmultimedia, JavaScript engines, browsers (WebKitChromium, Web Platform) or systems administration (this one not available for remotes, though), to other less “hands-on” types of roles like developer advocatesales engineer or project manager, so it’s possible there’s something interesting for you if you’re considering to join such an special company like this one.

See you in FOSDEM!

Going to FOSDEM!

Published / by mario / 1 Comment on Going to FOSDEM!

It’s been two years since the last time I went to FOSDEM, but it seems that this year I’m going to be there again and, after having traveled to Brussels a few times already by plane and train, this year I’m going by car!: from home to the Euro tunnel and then all the way up to Brussels. Let’s see how it goes.

FOSDEM 2017

As for the conference, I don’t have any particular plan other than going to some keynotes and probably spending most of my time in the Distributions and the Desktops devrooms. Well, and of course joining other GNOME people at A La Bécasse, on Saturday night.

As you might expect, I will have my Endless laptop with me while in the conference, so feel free to come and say “hi” in case you’re curious or want to talk about that if you see me around.

At the moment, I’m mainly focused on developing and improving our flatpak story, how we deliver apps to our users via this wonderful piece of technology and how the overall user experience ends up being, so I’d be more than happy to chat/hack around this topic and/or about how we integrate flatpak in EndlessOS, the challenges we found, the solutions we implemented… and so forth.

That said, flatpak is one of my many development hats in Endless, so be sure I’m open to talk about many other things, including not work-related ones, of course.

Now, if you excuse me, I have a bag to prepare, an English car to “adapt” for the journey ahead and, more importantly, quite some hours to sleep. Tomorrow it will be a long day, but it will be worth it.

See you at FOSDEM!

Frogr 0.11 released

Published / by mario / 6 Comments on Frogr 0.11 released

Screenshot of Frogr 0.11

So, after neglecting my responsibilities with this project for way too long, I finally released frogr 0.11 now, making the most that I’m now enjoying some kind of “parenting vacation” for a few days.

Still, do not expect this new release to be fully loaded of new features and vast improvements, as it’s more like another incremental update that adds a couple of nice new things and fixes a bunch of problems I was really unhappy about (e.g. general slowness, crashes).

Wrapping it up, the main changes included with this release are:

  • Moved to the new GTK+’s header bar plus the typical menu button when GTK+ >= 3.12 (GTK+ 3.4 is still supported). I personally like this change a lot, as it makes frogr much more compact and sleek IMHO, and much better integrated with newer releases of GNOME.
  • Added a new option to automatically replace the “date posted” field in flickr with the “date taken” value from the EXIF metadata when uploading pictures. Useful to keep your photo stream sorted regardless of when you uploaded which pictures. Thanks a lot to Luc Pionchon for requesting this feature. I never thought of it before, now I use it all the time!
  • Sped up the load of pictures into the main window, as it was a very slow process when importing tags from the XMP keywords was enabled. I measured a 3x improvement, but YMMV.
  • Fixed random crashes due to the missing initialization of the gcrypt library introduced with the recent changes to use SSL API end points. Thanks a lot Andrés for your help with this!
  • Fixed issues related to the OS X port, which prevented frogr 0.9 from having video support and caused many problems with the 0.10 release. Now it should be fine, grab the bundle from here.
  • Other things: removed calls to deprecated APIs, updated translations, fixed a few minor bugs and a bit of a clean-up here and there, which is usually good.

As usual, feel free to check the website of the project in case you want to know more about frogrhow to get it or how to contribute to it. I’m having a hard time lately to find time to devote to this pet project, so any help anyone can provide will be more than welcome 🙂 fosdem-15-logo

By the way, I’m going to FOSDEM this year again, so feel free to say “hi” if you want to chat and/or share a beer (or more!).

Back to FOSDEM

Published / by mario

So it seems I’m going to FOSDEM this year (yay!), together with a bunch of other Igalians who will be attending as well, coming from different places from across the globe (well, mainly from Europe this time).

I know some people will probably disagree with me on this, but for me FOSDEM is one of the greatest events of this kind, and so I’m quite happy to go there this time, specially after not being able to attend last year due to some unexpected (and unavoidable) personal matters.

Opposite to other occasions, this time I’ll be there not only as an attendant but also as an speaker, talking about WebKitGTK+, its status and the roadmap of the project towards WebKit2 (the split process model “flavour” of WebKit), together with my mate Philippe, on Sunday afternoon. Thus, for the first time ever, nobody will be able to accuse me of going there just because of the beer event, which wouldn’t be true anyway.

For the impatient ones, the talk will be mainly about reporting on the work done during the last months in “WebKitGTK+ land“, as well as on the stuff that is already planned for the upcoming releases. Good examples of those would be, for instance, the ongoing effort to add support for Accelerated Compositing, or just the new features related to WebKit2GTK+ such as, of course, the solution for enabling accessibility support there. Ah! And of course, we’ll try to run some demos there too… fingers crossed!

Besides, I’m of course looking forward to meeting some people I haven’t seen for a while now (haven’t attended to the latest Desktop Summit either, due to very good reasons too), so if you see me around and want to chat and/or meet for a while, just let me know. I must look shy, but it’s usually a matter of minutes (seconds?) for my shyness to go away…

So that’s it. Just a final line to say “thanks” to my company for fully sponsoring this thing.

See you in Brussels!