Bringing sanity back to my T440s

As a long time Thinkpad’s trackpoint user and owner of a Lenovo T440s, I always felt quite frustrated with the clickpad featured in this laptop, since it basically ditched away all the physical buttons I got so used to, and replace them all with a giant, weird and noisy “clickpad”.

Fortunately, following Peter Hutterer’s post on X.Org Synaptics support for the T440, I managed to get a semi-decent configuration where I basically disabled any movement in the touchpad and used it three giant soft buttons. It certainly took quite some time to get used to it and avoid making too many mistakes but it was at least usable thanks to that.

Then, just a few months ago from now, I learned about the new T450 laptops and how they introduced again the physical buttons for the trackpoint there… and felt happy and upset at the same time: happy to know that Lenovo finally reconsidered their position and decided to bring back some sanity to the legendary trackpoint, but upset because I realized I had bought the only Thinkpad to have ever featured such an insane device.

Luckily enough, I recently found that someone was selling this T450’s new touchpads with the physical buttons in eBay, and people in many places seemed to confirm that it would fit and work in the T440, T440s and T440p (just google for it), so I decided to give it a try.

So, the new touchpad arrived here last week and I did try to fit it, although I got a bit scared at some point and decided to step back and leave it for a while. After all, this laptop is 7 months old and I did not want to risk breaking it either :-). But then I kept reading the T440s’s Hardware Maintenance Manual in my spare time and learned that I was actually closer than what I thought, so decided to give it a try this weekend again… and this is the final result:

T440s with trackpoint buttons!

Initially, I thought of writing a detailed step by step guide on how to do the installation, but in the end it all boils down to removing the system board so that you can unscrew the old clickpad and screw the new one, so you just follow the steps in the T440s’s Hardware Maintenance Manual for that, and you should be fine.

If any, I’d just add that you don’t really need to remove the heatskink from the board, but just unplug the fan’s power cord, and that you can actually do this without removing the board completely, but just lifting it enough to manipulate the 2 hidden screws under it. Also, I do recommend disconnecting all the wires connected to the main board as well as removing the memory module, the Wifi/3G cards and the keyboard. You can probably lift the board without doing that, but I’d rather follow those extra steps to avoid nasty surprises.

Last, please remember that this model has a built-in battery that you need to disable from the BIOS before starting to work with it. This is a new step compared to older models (therefore easy to overlook) and quite an important one, so make sure you don’t forget about it!

Anyway, as you can see the new device fits perfectly fine in the hole of the former clickpad and it even gets recognized as a Synaptics touchpad, which is good. And even better, the touchpad works perfectly fine out of the box, with all the usual features you might expect: soft left and right buttons, 2-finger scrolling, tap to click…

The only problem is that the trackpoint’s buttons would not work that well: the left and right buttons would translate into “scroll up” and “scroll down” and the middle button would simply not work at all. Fortunately, this is also covered in Petter Hutterer’s blog, where he explains that all the problems I was seeing are expected at this moment, since some patches in the Kernel are needed for the 3 physical buttons to become visible via the trackpoint again.

But in any case, for those like me who just don’t care about the touchpad at all, this comment in the tracking bug for this issue explains a workaround to get the physical trackpoint buttons working well right now (middle button included), simply by disabling the Synaptics driver and enabling psmouse configured to use the imps protocol.

And because I’m using Fedora 21, I followed the recommendation there and simply added psmouse.proto=imps to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX line in /etc/default/grub, then run grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg, and that did the trick for me.

Now I went into the BIOS and disabled the “trackpad” option, not to get the mouse moving and clicking randomly, and finally enabled scrolling with the middle-button by creating a file in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/20-trackpoint.conf (based on the one from my old x201), like this:

Section "InputClass"
        Identifier "Trackpoint Wheel Emulation"
        MatchProduct "PS/2 Synaptics TouchPad"
        MatchDriver "evdev"
        Option  "EmulateWheel"  "true"
        Option  "EmulateWheelButton" "2"
        Option  "EmulateWheelInertia" "10"
        Option  "EmulateWheelTimeout" "190"
        Option  "Emulate3Buttons" "false"
        Option  "XAxisMapping"  "6 7"
        Option  "YAxisMapping"  "4 5"
EndSection

So that’s it. I suppose I will keep checking the status of the proper fix in the tracking bug and eventually move to the Synaptic driver again once all those issue get fixed, but for now this setup is perfect for me, and definitely way better than what I had before.

I only hope that I hadn’t forgotten to plug a cable when assembling everything back. At least, I can tell I haven’t got any screw left and everything I’ve tested seems to work as expected, so I guess it’s probably fine. Fingers crossed!

Building a SNES emulator with a Raspberry Pi and a PS3 gamepad

It’s been a while since I did this, but I got some people asking me lately about how exactly I did it and I thought it could be nice to write a post answering that question. Actually, it would be a nice thing for me to have anyway at least as “documentation”, so here it is.

But first of all, the idea: my personal and very particular goal was to have a proper SNES emulator plugged to my TV, based on the Raspberry Pi (simply because I had a spare one) that I could control entirely with a gamepad (no external keyboards, no ssh connection from a laptop, nothing).

Yes, I know there are other emulators I could aim for and even Raspberry specific distros designed for a similar purpose but, honestly, I don’t really care about MAME, NeoGeo, PSX emulators or the like. I simply wanted a SNES emulator, period. And on top of that I was quite keen on playing a bit with the Raspberry, so I took this route, for good or bad.

Anyway, after doing some investigation I realized all the main pieces were already out there for me to build such a thing, all that was needed was to put them all together, so I went ahead and did it. And these are the HW & SW ingredients involved in this recipe:

Once I got all these things around, this is how I assembled the whole thing:

1. Got the gamepad paired and recognized as a joystick under /dev/input/js0 using the QtSixA project. I followed the instructions here, which explain fairly well how to use sixpair to pair the gamepad and how to get the sixad daemon running at boot time, which was an important requirement for this whole thing to work as I wanted it to.

2. I downloaded the source code of PiSNES, then patched it slightly so that it would recognize the PS3 DualShock gamepad, allow me define the four directions of the joystick through the configuration file, among other things.

3. I had no idea how to get the PS3 gamepad paired automatically when booting the Raspberry Pi, so I wrote a stupid small script that would basically wait for the gamepad to be detected under /dev/input/js0, and then launch the snes9x.gui GUI to choose a game from the list of ROMS available. I placed it under /usr/local/bin/snes-run-gui, and looks like this:

#!/bin/bash

BASEDIR=/opt/pisnes

# Wait for the PS3 Game pad to be available
while [ ! -e /dev/input/js0 ]; do sleep 2; done

# The DISPLAY=:0 bit is important for the GUI to work
DISPLAY=:0 $BASEDIR/snes9x.gui

4. Because I wanted that script to be launched on boot, I simply added a line to /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE/autostart, so that it looked like this:

@lxpanel --profile LXDE
@pcmanfm --desktop --profile LXDE
@xscreensaver -no-splash
@/etc/sudoers.d/vsrv.sh
@/usr/local/bin/snes-run-gui

By doing the steps mentioned above, I got the following “User Experience”:

  1. Turn on the RPi by simply plugging it in
  2. Wait for Raspbian to boot and for the desktop to be visible
  3. At this point, both the sixad daemon and the snes-run-gui script should be running, so press the PS button in the gamepad to connect the gamepad
  4. After a few seconds, the lights in the gamepad should stop blinking and the /dev/input/js0 device file should be available, so snes9x.gui is launched
  5. Select the game you want to play and press with the ‘X’ button to run it
  6. While in the game, press the PS button to get back to the game selection UI
  7. From the game selection UI, press START+SELECT to shutdown the RPi
  8. Profit!

Unfortunately, those steps above were enough to get the gamepad paired and working with PiSNES, but my TV was a bit tricky and I needed to do a few adjustments more in the booting configuration of the Raspberry Pi, which took me a while to find out too.

So, here is the contents of my /boot/config.txt file in case it helps somebody else out there, or simply as reference (more info about the contents of this file in RPiConfig):

# NOOBS Auto-generated Settings:
hdmi_force_hotplug=1
config_hdmi_boost=4
overscan_left=24
overscan_right=24
overscan_top=16
overscan_bottom=16
disable_overscan=0
core_freq=250
sdram_freq=500
over_voltage=2

# Set sdtv mode to PAL (as used in Europe)
sdtv_mode=2

# Force sound to be sent over the HDMI cable
hdmi_drive=2

# Set monitor mode to DMT
hdmi_group=2

# Overclock the CPU a bit (700 MHz is the default)
arm_freq=900

# Set monitor resolution to 1280x720p @ 60Hz XGA
hdmi_mode=85

As you can imagine, some of those configuration options are specific to the TV I have it connected to (e.g. hdmi_mode), so YMMV. In my case I actually had to try different HDMI modes before settling on one that would simply work, so if you are ever in the same situation, you might want to apt-get install libraspberrypi-bin and use the following commands as well:

 $ tvservice -m DMT # List all DMT supported modes
 $ tvservice -d edid.dat # Dump detailed info about your screen
 $ edidparser edid.dat | grep mode # List all possible modes

In my case, I settled on hdmi_mode=85 simply because that’s the one that work better for me, which stands for the 1280x720p@60Hz DMT mode, according to edidparser:

HDMI:EDID DMT mode (85) 1280x720p @ 60 Hz with pixel clock 74 MHz has a score of 80296

And that’s all I think. Of course there’s a chance I forgot to mention something because I did this in my random slots of spare time I had back in July, but that should be pretty much it.

Now, simply because this post has been too much text already, here you have a video showing off how this actually works (and let alone how good/bad I am playing!):

Video: Raspberry Pi + PS3 Gamepad + PiSNES

I have to say I had great fun doing this and, even if it’s a quite hackish solution, I’m pretty happy with it because it’s been so much fun to play those games again, and also because it’s been working like a charm ever since I set it up, more than half a year ago.

And even better… turns out I got it working just in time for “Father’s Day”, which made me win the “best dad in the world” award, unanimously granted by my two sons, who also enjoy playing those good old games with me now (and beating me on some of them!).

Actually, that has been certainly the most rewarding thing of all this, no doubt about it.

GStreamer Hackfest 2015

Last weekend I visited my former office in (lovely) Staines-upon-Thames (UK) to attend the GStreamer hackfest 2015, along with other ~30 hackers from all over the world.

This was my very first GStreamer hackfest ever and it was definitely a great experience, although at the beginning I was really not convinced to attend since, after all, why bother attending an event about something I have no clue about?

But the answer turned out to be easy in the end, once I actually thought a bit about it: it would be a good opportunity both to learn more about the project and to meet people in real life (old friends included), making the most of it happening 15min away from my house. So, I went there.

And in the end it was a quite productive and useful weekend: I might not be an expert by now, but at least I broke the barrier of getting started with the project, which is already a good thing.

And even better, I managed to move forward a patch to fix a bug in PulseAudio I found on last December while fixing an downstream issue as part of my job at Endless. Back then, I did not have the time nor the knowledge to write a proper patch that could really go upstream, so I focused on fixing the problem at hand in our platform. But I always felt the need to sit down and cook a proper patch, and this event proved to be the perfect time and place to do that.

Now, thanks to the hackfest (and to Arun Raghavan in particular, thanks!), I’m quite happy to see that the right patch might be on its way to be applied upstream. Could not be happier about it! :)

Last, I’d like to thank to Samsung’s OSG, and specially to Luis, for having done a cracking job on making sure that everything would run smoothly from beginning to end. Thanks!

Frogr 0.11 released

Screenshot of Frogr 0.11

So, after neglecting my responsibilities with this project for way too long, I finally released frogr 0.11 now, making the most that I’m now enjoying some kind of “parenting vacation” for a few days.

Still, do not expect this new release to be fully loaded of new features and vast improvements, as it’s more like another incremental update that adds a couple of nice new things and fixes a bunch of problems I was really unhappy about (e.g. general slowness, crashes).

Wrapping it up, the main changes included with this release are:

  • Moved to the new GTK+’s header bar plus the typical menu button when GTK+ >= 3.12 (GTK+ 3.4 is still supported). I personally like this change a lot, as it makes frogr much more compact and sleek IMHO, and much better integrated with newer releases of GNOME.
  • Added a new option to automatically replace the “date posted” field in flickr with the “date taken” value from the EXIF metadata when uploading pictures. Useful to keep your photo stream sorted regardless of when you uploaded which pictures. Thanks a lot to Luc Pionchon for requesting this feature. I never thought of it before, now I use it all the time!
  • Sped up the load of pictures into the main window, as it was a very slow process when importing tags from the XMP keywords was enabled. I measured a 3x improvement, but YMMV.
  • Fixed random crashes due to the missing initialization of the gcrypt library introduced with the recent changes to use SSL API end points. Thanks a lot Andrés for your help with this!
  • Fixed issues related to the OS X port, which prevented frogr 0.9 from having video support and caused many problems with the 0.10 release. Now it should be fine, grab the bundle from here.
  • Other things: removed calls to deprecated APIs, updated translations, fixed a few minor bugs and a bit of a clean-up here and there, which is usually good.

As usual, feel free to check the website of the project in case you want to know more about frogrhow to get it or how to contribute to it. I’m having a hard time lately to find time to devote to this pet project, so any help anyone can provide will be more than welcome :-) fosdem-15-logo

By the way, I’m going to FOSDEM this year again, so feel free to say “hi” if you want to chat and/or share a beer (or more!).

Endless changes ahead!

I know I haven’t blogged for a while, and definitely not as much as I would like, but that was partially because I was quite busy during my last days in Samsung (left on the 25th of July), where I wanted to make sure I did not leave any loose end before departure, and that everything was properly handed over to the right people there.

But that was one month ago… so what did I do since then? Many many things, and most of them away from a keyboard, at least until the past week. Main highlights:

  • One week travelling by car with my family all the way down to Spain from the UK, through France, visiting all the nice places we could (and could afford) in the way, which was a lot of fun and an incredible experience.
  • The goal of taking the car to Spain was to sell it once we were there and, surprisingly enough, we did it in record time, so one thing less to worry about…
  • 2 weeks in Spain having proper “relaxing holidays” to get some quality time off in between the two jobs, to properly recharge batteries. Not that the previous week was not holidays, but travelling 2200 km by car with two young kids on the back can be amazing and exhausting at the same time :-)
  • 1 week in the UK to make sure I had everything ready by the time I officially started in the new company, where I will initially be working from home: assemble a home office in my spare bedroom, and prepare my new laptop mainly. In the end, we (my wife helped me a lot) finished by Wednesday, so on Thursday we went for a last 2-day getaway to Wales (what a beautiful place!) by car, making the most that we were kids-free.

Endless Mobile logoTherefore, as you can imagine, I didn’t have much time for blogging lately, but still I would like to share with the world my “change of affiliation” so here it is: since yesterday I’m officially part of the amazing team at Endless, an awesome start up from San Francisco committed to break the digital divide in the developing world by taking GNOME-based technology to the end users in ways that were not imaginable before. And I have to say that’s a vision I fell in love with since the very first time I heard about it (last year in Brno, during Matt’s keynote at GUADEC).

But just in case that was not awesome enough by itself, the other thing that made me fall in love with the company was precisely the team they have assembled, because even if I’m mostly a technical guy, I still value a lot the human side of the places I work in. And in this regard Endless seems to be perfect, or even better!

So, I’m extremely happy these days because of this new challenge I’m seeing in front of me, and because of the opportunity I’m being given to have a real positive impact in the lives of millions of people who still can’t access to technology as they should be able to do it. Also, I feel blessed and privileged for having been given the chance to be part of such an amazing team of people. Could not be happier at this time! :)

Last to finish this post, I would like to say thanks to my friend Joaquim, since he was who introduced me to Matt in the first place and “created” this opportunity for me. Thank you!

Frogr 0.10 released

frogrQuick post to let the world know that I’ve just released a new version of frogr right now, in order to address a few issues present in the previous version. Mainly:

  • Deprecation of non-SSL end points for the Flickr API (see these two posts for more info). From now on, frogr will use SSL-only API calls.
  • Address issues with frogr‘s AppData file. Apparently, the AppData file was neither valid (according to appdata-validate) nor being installed properly, preventing frogr from showing up nicely in the GNOME Software app.
  • Allow disabling video uploads at configuration time (enabled by default), instead of making the decision depending on the detected platform. This will hopefully make life easier for packagers of other platforms (e.g. MacPorts).
  • Removed libsoup-gnome code once and for all (API deprecated a while ago).
  • Other things: updated translations and fixed a few minor bugs.

As usual, feel free to check the website of the project in case you want to know more about frogrhow to get it or how to contribute to it.

Frogr 0.9 released

So, after a bit more than one year without releasing any version of frogr, I finally managed to get some “spare” time to put all the pieces together and ship the ninth version of it, which I believe/hope is going to be a quite solid one.

Frogr 0.9

In all honesty, though, this version does not come with many new features as the previous ones, yet some changes and fixes that I believe were quite necessary, and therefore should help improving the user experience in some subtle ways.

For instance, the layout of the dialog to edit the details of a picture has changed (as per Ana Rey‘s comments during GUADEC) to enable a more efficient usage of vertical space, so much needed these days in small widescreen laptops. Of course, design-wise still sucks, but I believe it’s much more convenient now from a pragmatical point of view.

Also, frogr is now a little bit more “modern” in things such as that it now supports GStreamer 1.0 (0.10 still supported), a lot of deprecated code (e.g. Stock items, GtkActions) has been replaced internally and it now integrates better with GNOME Shell’s search box. Ah! and it also now provides an AppData file to integrate with GNOME Software Center, which is a nice touch too.

Another interesting thing is that I finally fixed the problem that we have with multiple selections in the main view, which was neither intuitive nor very useful, as Ctrl and Shift modifiers did not work as expected. So, from now on, it is finally possible to work with disjoint multiple selections of pictures, a feature I was missing so much.

Last, I fixed two important problems in the code that caused frogr consume two much memory, specially after uploading pictures. It was a quite severe problem since frogr was not properly freeing the memory used by pictures even after those were uploaded and removed from the UI, causing important issues in cases where people tried to upload a lot of pictures at once. It’s hopefully fixed now.

And that’s all I think. As usual, you can check the website of the project to know how to install frogr on your system if you don’t want to wait for your favourite distribution to ship it, or if you just want to check more information about the project or to contribute to it.

FOSDEM 2014

Ah! By the way… I’m going to FOSDEM again this year, but this time by train. Can’t wait to be there! :)

WebKitGTK+ Hackfest 2013: The Return of the Thing

The WebKitGTK+ Hackfest 2013As many other WebKitGTK+ hackers (30 in total), I flew last Saturday to A Coruña to attend the 5th edition of the WebKitGTK+ Hackfest, hosted once again by Igalia at their premises and where people from several different affiliations gathered together to try to give our beloved port a boost.

As for me, I flew there to work mainly on accessibility related issues, making the most of the fact that both Joanie (Orca maintainer) and Piñeiro (ATK maintainer) would be there too, so it should be possible to make things happen faster, specially discussion-wise.

And turns out that, even if I feel like I could have achieved more than what I actually did (as usual), I believe we did quite well in the end: we discussed and clarified things that were blocking the mapping of new WAI-ARIA roles in WebKitGTK+, we got rid of a bunch of WebKit1-specific unit tests (Joanie converted them into nice layout tests that will be run by WebKit2GTK+ too), we got a few new roles in ATK to be able to better map things from the web world and and we fixed a couple of issues in the way too.

Of course, not everything has been rainbows and unicorns, as it seems that one of the patches I landed broke the inspector for WebKit2GTK+ (sorry Gustavo!). Fortunately, that one has been rolled out already and I hope I will be able to get back to it soon (next week?) to provide a better patch for that without causing any problem. Fingers crossed.

In the other hand, my mate Brian Holt joined us for three days too and, despite of being his first time in the hackfest, he got integrated pretty quickly with other hackers, teaming up to collaborate in the big boost that the network process & multiple web processes items have went through during the event. And not only that, he also managed to give a boost to his last patch to provide automatic memory leak detection in WebKitGTK+, which I’m sure it will be a great tool once it’s finished and integrated upstream.

Anyway, if you want more details on those topics, or anything else, please check out the blog posts that other hackers have been posting these days, specially Carlos’s blog post, which is quite extensive and detailed.

Samsung LogoOf course, I would like to thank the main sponsors Igalia and the GNOME Foundation for making this thing happen again, and to my employer Samsung  for helping as well by paying our trips and accommodation, as well as the snacks and the coffee that helped us stay alive and get fatter during the hackfest.

Last, I would like to mention (in case anyone reading this wondered) that it has indeed felt a bit strange to go the city where I used to live in and stay in a hotel, not to mention going to the office where I used to work in and hang around it as a visitor. However, both my former city and my former colleagues somehow ensured that I felt as “at home” once again, and so I can’t do anything about it but feeling enormously grateful for that.

Thank you all, and see you next year!

Greppin’ in the past with git

It seems that one can never stop learning new things with git, no matter for how long you’ve been using it (in my case, I’m a proud git user since 2008), because today I added a new trick to my toolbox, that already proved to be quite useful: “grepping” files in a git repository, as you would do it with git grep, but using a commit-id to limit the search to a specific snapshot of your project.

In other words, I found that it’s possible to do things like, say, grep files to search for something in your repository considering how it was, say, some commits ago.

This is the “magical” command:

    git grep <search-params> <tree-id>

This is what I get if I try to search for updateBackingStore() in my local clone of WebKit, as if my current branch was “50 commits older” than what it actually is:

$ git grep updateBackingStore HEAD~50
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:AccessibilityObject.cpp:void AccessibilityObject::updateBackingStore()
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:AccessibilityObject.h:    void updateBackingStore();
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:AccessibilityObject.h:inline void AccessibilityObject::updateBackingStore() { }
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:atk/WebKitAccessibleUtil.h:        coreObject->updateBackingStore(); \
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:atk/WebKitAccessibleUtil.h:        coreObject->updateBackingStore(); \
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:atk/WebKitAccessibleWrapperAtk.cpp:    coreObject->updateBackingStore();
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:ios/WebAccessibilityObjectWrapperIOS.mm:    m_object->updateBackingStore();
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:ios/WebAccessibilityObjectWrapperIOS.mm:    m_object->updateBackingStore();
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:mac/WebAccessibilityObjectWrapperBase.mm:    // Calling updateBackingStore() can invalidate this element so self must be retained.
0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669:mac/WebAccessibilityObjectWrapperBase.mm:    m_object->updateBackingStore();

I don’t know about you, but I find this quite useful for me to answer questions such as “Where was this function being used in commit X?”, and things like that.

Anyway, you might have noticed that I mentioned <tree-id> in the recipe instead of <commit-id>, yet I used HEAD~50 in the example, which is actually a commit-id. And still works.

And the short explanation, without trying to explain here all the different kind of data types that git keeps internally for every repository (mainly commitstrees and blobs), is that git is smart enough to find the right tree-id associated to a given commit-id by just considering the current path inside the repository and the tree-id associated to the top directory for a given commit.

But how to know that tree-id myself in case I want to? Easy, just pretty print the full information of the commit object you’re interested in, instead of only seeing the abbreviated version (what you usually see with git show or git log:

$ git cat-file -p HEAD~50
tree 0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669
parent bdb7a7949a29988da3fe50a65d6c694d5084d379
author [...]

See that tree thing in the first line? That’s the tree-id that git needs for grepping, which as you can see can be easily extracted from a particular commit. Actually, you could get easily the tree-id for any subdirectory from this point, by using the git ls-tree command:

$ git ls-tree 0ae236137d560da6ca889a826a8f3d023364a669
100644 blob 3fe2340c9614e893f0dfeb720f23773bbf1ea076	.dir-locals.el
100644 blob 741c4d53b5a0338cf36900a283e89408d0f9d457	.gitattributes
100644 blob f45a975762be9a429aa971c18da01b433c559553	.gitignore
100644 blob d571aa28ea86c14c7880533bf3ba68e9ef4b3c81	.qmake.conf
100644 blob 10f85055ae9f3823f0d20808599f644c18af7921	CMakeLists.txt
100644 blob 5eb66e7bcbc7543eb3a4dbf183a9043545776659	ChangeLog
100644 blob 7dbe9d2e0029bab47b8b2b22065a1032ecfe4434	ChangeLog-2012-05-22
040000 tree d42a0b3121ed7993cfd250426d20472769760f87	Examples
100644 blob 78d89e5c70ad56c38b0c25e7705d42fa380c4ee0	GNUmakefile.am
040000 tree 4a9e87fc1f35efa1349a18b1df694530c981c57e	LayoutTests
100644 blob 14e33157011157797dac62c494bac0bf254d7c2f	Makefile
100644 blob ee723d830dea51d1ce9e2d1ad8c985eeca2d4f3f	Makefile.shared
040000 tree 20c763d6a4e8749ad9e041e8372e9f47dc722f45	ManualTests
040000 tree 660d88b926cf618ab9e1612b8e2a3e97b15dbcbe	PerformanceTests
040000 tree fbf9703d3e9a9e4cf2ff10817c99ba3a5de87410	Source
040000 tree 346110c441a674334f5f56ef42b9dd40def89c76	Tools
040000 tree 262cb11d9b491be35daee570f9b825bce5715579	WebKit.xcworkspace
040000 tree b9e48a7a24b4973b253ee14053808b40d67c94aa	WebKitLibraries
040000 tree adce37b690957abdd21d2dd8ff77302c5a5a9071	Websites
100755 blob befd429487fc5ac9bb3494800f4eeaef1e607663	autogen.sh

And of course, “navigating” with more calls to git ls-tree you could also get the tree-id for a specific subdirectory, in case you wanted to constraint the search to that specific path of your repo.

However, considering that git is so good at translating a commit-id into a tree-id, my personal recommendation is that, instead, you first cd into the path you want to focus the search in, and then let git  do its “magic” by just using the git grep <search-params> <tree-id> command.

So that’s it. Hope you find this useful, and please do not hesitate to share any comment or suggestion you might have with regard to this or any other “git trick” you might know.

I honestly love using git so much that sometimes I wonder if coding is not just a poor excuse to use git. Probably not, but the thing is that I can not imagine my life without it anymore. That’s a fact.

Goodbye Pango! Goodbye GAIL!

As I mentioned in my previous post before GUADEC, I’ve been putting some effort lately on trying to improve the accessibility layer of WebKitGTK+, as part of my work here at Samsung, and one of the main things I’ve worked on was the removal of the dependency we had on Pango and GAIL to implement the atk_text_get_text_*_offset() family of functions for the different text boundaries.

And finally, I’m really happy to say that such a task is complete once and for all, meaning that now those functions should work as well or as bad on WebKit2GTK+ as they do in WebKitGTK+, so the weird behaviour described in bug 73433 is no longer an issue. You can check I’m not lying by just taking a look to the commit that removed both all trace of Pango and GAIL in the code, as well as and the one that removed the GAIL dependency from the build system. And if you want more detail, just feel free to check the whole dependency tree in WebKit’s bugzilla.

This task has been an interesting challenge for me indeed, and not only because it was one of the biggest accessibility related tasks I’ve worked on in WebKitGTK+ since late 2012 (so I needed to get my brain trained again on it), but also because reimplementing these functions forced me to dive into text editing and accessibility code in WebCore as I never did before. And it’s so cool to see how, despite of having to deal eventually with the frustrating feeling of hitting my head against a wall, at the end of the day it all resulted on a nice set of patches that do the work and help advance the state of the ATK based accessibility layer in WebKitGTK+ forward.

Anyway, even though that is probably the thing that motivated me to write this blog post, that was not the only thing that I did since GUADEC (which has been a blast, by the way):

On the personal side, I’ve spent two lovely weeks in Spain on holidays, which was the biggest period of time I’ve been outside of the UK since I arrived here, and had  an amazing time there just “doing nothing”(tm) but lying around on the beach and seeing the grass grow. And there is not much grass there anywhere, so you can imagine how stressful that life was… it was great.

In the other hand, on the professional side, I’d say that one of the other big things that happened to me lately was that I finally became accepted as a WebKit reviewer, meaning that now I can not only help breaking the Web, but also authorize others to do it so. And while agree that might be fun in some way, it probably would not be very cool, so forgive me if I try instead to do my best to help get exactly the opposite result: make things work better.

And truth to be told, this “upgrade” came just with perfect timing, since these days quite some work is being done in the accessibility layer for both the WebKitGTK+ and the WebKitEFL ports thanks also to my mates Denis NomiyamaAnton ObzhirovBrian Holt and Krzysztof Czech from Samsung, and that work would ideally need to be reviewed by someone familiar with the ATK/AT-SPI based accessibility stack. And while I’m still by far not the most knowledgeable person in the world when it comes to those topics, I believe I might have a fairly well knowledge about it anyway, so I assume (and hope) that my reviews will certainly add value and help with those specific pieces of work.

And as a nice plus, now I can finally “return the favour” to the only accessibility reviewer WebKit had until now (Chris Fleizach) by helping reviewing his patches as well, in a similar fashion to what he has been tirelessly doing for me for the last 3 years and a half. Yay!

To finish , I’d like to get back again to the original topic of this post and say a big “thank you” to everyone who helped me along the way with the removal of Pango and GAIL from the ATK specific code. Special thanks go to those who spend time performing the code reviews, as it’s the case of Martin, Gustavo and Chris. I wouldn’t be writing this post otherwise.

Thanks!